Last updated on March 11th, 2018 at 10:16 pm

Owning an inflatable kayak opens up a whole world of opportunities for new adventures and fun on the water. They offer a number of unique benefits over traditional hard-shell kayaks and their growing popularity means a huge variety of styles and features to choose from.

The goal of this guide is to provide tips and advice for choosing an inflatable kayak as well as rounding up and reviewing some of the best inflatable kayaks on the market today.

Best Inflatable Kayak

The first part of this guide is full of information and tips to help you know what to look for in an inflatable kayak. If you already know what to look for, you can skip ahead to the reviews section or individual picks for different types of paddling.

Top Inflatable Kayaks by Category

 

Benefits of Inflatable Kayaks

Inflatable kayaks offer a lot of unique benefits; here are some of the top reasons paddlers choose one over a traditional hard-shell kayak.

Top 5 Reasons to Choose an Inflatable Kayak

  1. Easy Storage – Inflatable kayaks require very little space to store. Typical hard-bodied kayaks are 10-16 feet long and often need to be stored out of direct sunlight because they can be damaged by UV rays. Most inflatables will pack down to roughly the dimensions of a medium-sized suitcase.
  2. Portability – Hard bodied kayaks require a car rack, trailer, or large empty vehicle to transport. On the other hand, most inflatables will fit into the trunk of a small car with room to spare. Inflatables are also a lot easier to carry if you plan to hike into your paddling location or have a long walk from where you parked your car to where you’ll launch.
  3. Stability – Something that doesn’t always get as much attention as it should is the stability of a kayak. Inflatable kayaks are typically wider than rigid kayaks, which makes them some of the most stable kayaks around.
  4. Affordability – While there are a ton of high-end inflatables to choose from, inflatable kayaks also happen to be a great option for getting into kayaking on a budget.
  5. Better Vacations – It’s possible to fly with an inflatable kayak so you can bring it with you on vacation.

Don’t inflatable kayaks pop easily?

This is probably the single biggest concern for most people considering an inflatable kayak, and with good reason. Who wants to spend their hard earned money on an inflatable and have it pop the first time they bump into a rock or stick?

The reality is that, like most things, you get what you pay for with inflatable kayaks. But having said that, even cheap inflatable kayaks can be surprisingly durable.

Inflatable kayaks have particularly good abrasion resistance, which is an issue for polyethylene hard-bodied kayaks.

Of course, it’s still best to avoid repeatedly running into sharp sticks and rocks – the same holds true for hard-shell kayaks. But once you take a step up from the cheapest inflatables, they can take some pretty serious punishment.

Quick Tip

It’s also worth noting that some manufacturers have a layer of fabric covering the outside of the kayak to give it some additional resistance to punctures and scrapes.

Keep an eye out for this style of kayak if durability is especially important to you.

Ease of Repair

It’s true that, while resilient, inflatables aren’t as puncture resistant as rigid kayaks. Most of the time sticks and rocks will just slide off the slippery surface of an inflatable, but it is possible for a hard hit from a sharp object to cause a puncture.

One of the great things about inflatable kayaks is that they’re generally easy to repair, unlike some rigid kayaks.

Patching a leak is pretty straightforward and doesn’t require any special skills. Most manufacturers will even include a patch kit with their kayaks.

 

Downsides of Inflatable Kayaks

With their unique advantages, inflatables also come with a few downsides that are important to be aware of before getting one.

Downsides of Inflatable Kayaks

  1. Performance – This is pretty well known but is worth mentioning as it’s arguably the biggest downside to an inflatable. When compared to hard-shells, inflatables aren’t as fast and don’t track as well through the water. While features like skegs, rigid frames, and narrower hulls help, even the highest performing inflatables won’t quite reach the performance levels of quality hard-shells.
  2. Additional time to setup & deflate – Most inflatables can be set up in about 10-15 minutes, depending on its size and how many separate air chambers it has. Expect it to take a bit longer your first time or two inflating it. Deflating often only takes a few minutes but should still be factored in.
  3. Needs to be dry before packing away – Packing away a wet inflatable can promote mildew growth, so you’ll want to make sure your kayak is dry before storing it away. Drying it out takes some additional effort and can be a little inconvenient at times.
  4. PVC and the environment – Most recreational inflatables are made out of PVC plastic, which isn’t recyclable and isn’t biodegradable. There are also some concerns over chemical emissions that are released during the manufacturing and disposal of PVC materials. Look for a synthetics rubber inflatable if this is important to you.

Where will you be kayaking?

Inflatable kayaks are designed with different types of paddling in mind. Some are better suited to lakes and slow moving rivers, while others are better for paddling coastal waters.

It’s important to consider where you want to kayak before deciding on a kayak.

Types of Paddling

  • Lakes, calm rivers & sheltered bays – These are the least demanding conditions for an inflatable kayak and you’ll be able to get away with something pretty basic. Consider moving up from a basic model if you want to cover longer distances or you’ll be out for more than a few hours at a time.
  • Exposed coastal water – Basic inflatable kayaks aren’t intended to handle the wind and rougher conditions you find in exposed coastal water. Look for an inflatable that sits low in the water and has either a defined hull or comes with a rigid frame. Having a skeg to help with tracking is also a good idea. The ability to use a spray skirt or the addition of self bailing scupper holes will help on a choppy day.
  • Rapids – Once you get to class III rapids and above you need to be a bit more selective about your kayak. Look for an inflatable that has self bailing scupper holes. Whitewater inflatables also usually have a bow and stern that curve upward to help climb over waves.

Features & Considerations: What to look for

Durability

The vast majority of recreational inflatables on the market are built using PVC (vinyl) plastic sandwiched around a durable core fabric, like nylon or polyester. A thicker material or a tougher fabric generally means a more durable kayak.

Manufacturers don’t always advertise the quality of the material they use, but when they do it is typically expressed in two ways:

  1. Gauge: refers to the overall thickness of the material – a lower number means a thicker material
  2. Denier: refers to the density of the core fabric – a higher number means greater durability.

Some of the lower end inflatables will exclude the core fabric altogether, which lowers the durability of the kayak. But on the plus side, doing so makes them much cheaper.

The most durable inflatables are made out of synthetic rubber rather than PVC. The material costs and extra labor required to build these kayaks makes them significantly more expensive than PVC inflatables – often 3 to 4 times as much. Rubber inflatables are typically a bit overkill for most recreational uses, but consider one if you’re going to do some serious whitewater kayaking or you want something that will hold up to decades of hard use.

Weight Capacity

Most manufacturers will label the weight capacity of their kayaks. Just keep in mind that these are generally a maximum weight capacity.

Unfortunately, kayak manufacturers haven’t standardized on a way to calculate the weight capacity of an inflatable kayak, so comparing weight capacities isn’t always perfect.

A good rule of thumb, though, is to get a kayak that has about 50% more weight capacity than you expect to need.

Here’s an example: you weigh 175 pounds, your paddling partner weighs 200, and you’re bringing 25 pounds of gear for a total of 400 pounds. You’d want a kayak with a weight capacity of 50% more than 400, or in the ballpark of 600 pounds.

Length

Longer inflatables not only give you more legroom and space for gear, they also help the kayak track in a straight line through the water. Shorter kayaks will have more of a tendency to swerve back and forth as you paddle. The downside is that longer kayaks are more prone to catching the wind and can be harder to handle if there’s a crosswind going.

Width

Width plays a significant role in the stability of a kayak. As a rule of thumb, wider kayaks are more stable than narrower ones.

The big downside of a wider kayak is the increased surface area that creates drag against the water, which slows down the kayak.

Single vs Tandem

Inflatable kayaks come in both single and tandem (2-person) setups. A common issue people have is deciding between getting two single kayaks or one tandem one.

Tandems work great if you know you’ll always be paddling with a partner and you’re able to paddle well and stay in sync with each other. But paddling a tandem by yourself can be a bit awkward and take some of the fun out of being on the water.

On the other hand, singles give you the ultimate freedom to decide where you want to go and gives you the flexibility to head out by yourself if your paddle partner isn’t available.

If you plan to do a mix of single and tandem paddling and not sure which kind you should get, consider a convertible.

Convertible inflatable kayaks allow you to adjust the seat positions and convert a tandem into a single. It’s still not quite as efficient as paddling a single, but is miles ahead of trying to paddle a tandem by yourself. Not to mention, one convertible kayak will almost always be cheaper than two single kayaks.

Storage Space

While inflatables tend to be wider than hard-shell kayaks, the air chambers of an inflatable actually take up a fair bit of space and often don’t leave much room for additional gear. This isn’t really an issue if you only plan to be out for an hour or two at a time, but may become an issue for longer trips.

Extended trips will mean bringing extra food and water, as well as other essentials. Look for a larger boat or one that has extra storage features if you have a lot of gear or are planning on some longer trips.

Skeg

Inflatable kayaks typically don’t track as well as their hard-bodied cousins, which causes them to swerve through the water in an “S” shape as you paddle. Skegs are fins on the bottom of the kayak that minimize swerving and help you move in a straight line.

Rigid Frame

There are a handful of high-performance inflatable kayaks on the market that come with a built-in rigid frame. The frame helps give a defined structure to the hull (bottom) of the kayak and greatly improves tracking and speed. These inflatble kayaks are as close as you’ll get to the performance of a traditional hard-shell.

Self Bailing

Some kayaks are self bailing, which means they have holes in the bottom of the kayak that let water drain out. Of course, that means that some water can also get in. The bottom of a self bailing kayak is all but guaranteed to be wet.

Self bailing kayaks aren’t something you should specifically look for unless you expect a lot of water to get inside the kayak. Consider one if you plan to do a lot of swimming from the kayak or if you’ll be paddling some moderate rapids and are likely to get splashed.

 

Best Inflatable Kayak Reviews

Intex Challenger K1 (single)

Intex Challenger K1 (single)

Intex Challenger K1 Kayak, 1-Person Inflatable Kayak Set with Aluminum Oars and High Output Air Pump

Overview:

  • Length: 9′
  • Width: 30″
  • Weight: 27.2 pounds
  • Weight Capacity: 220 pounds
  • Deflated size: 16.25 in x 23.125 in x 8.5 in

Durability: 

Performance: 

Value: 

Features: Inflatable and adjustable seat, cargo net storage, removable skeg, includes paddle

Ideal for: Paddlers on a budget. Lakes and slow rivers.

  from $96.05

Buy on Amazon

(price updated as of 2019-05-25 at 22:56 – Details)

 

The Challenger K1’s biggest selling feature is the value it offers; this is going to be one of the most affordable options for you to get out on the water.

At 30 inches wide, the Challenger is narrower than most other inflatables, sacrificing some stability for increased speed.

It has an inflatable seat and comes with an included aluminum paddle that breaks down for easier transportation and storage.

One of the unique features of the Challenger is its cargo storage net on the bow of the kayak, which gives you a bit of storage space for a jacket, water bottle, or other essentials.

For more details, read the full Intex Challenger K1 review.

 

Intex Explorer K2 (tandem)

Intex Explorer K2 (tandem)

Intex Explorer K2 Kayak, 2-Person Inflatable Kayak Set with Aluminum Oars and High Output Air Pump

Overview:

  • Length: 10′ 3″
  • Width: 36″
  • Weight: 31.13 pounds
  • Weight Capacity: 400 pounds
  • Deflated size: 16.25 in x 23.125 in x 13.5 in

Durability: 

Performance: 

Value: 

Features: adjustable and removable seats, carry handles, removable skeg, includes paddles

Ideal for: Paddlers on a budget. Lakes and slow rivers. A mix of both single and tandem paddling.

  from $69.99

Buy on Amazon

(price updated as of 2019-05-25 at 23:36 – Details)

The Explorer K2 is another budget option that offers some great value. It’s not the most durable inflatable around, but it’ll get you and a paddling buddy on the water without breaking the bank. For more info, you can read the deatailed Intex Explorer K2 review.

While the Explorer’s seats can be adjusted, it’s not quite a true convertible kayak. You can only reposition the seats so much and the weight balance won’t be quite right for paddling solo. Not to say that you can’t paddle solo; it’s possible, just not optimal.

At 36 inches wide, it’s one of the wider inflatables you’ll find, making it nice and stable but a bit slower moving through the water. The removable skeg helps it to track straighter through the water. The included paddles break down for easy transportation.

 

Sevylor Quikpak K1 (single)

Sevylor Quikpak K1 (single)

Sevylor Quikpak K1 1-Person Kayak

Overview:

  • Length: 8’ 7”
  • Width: 36”
  • Weight: 18 pounds
  • Weight Capacity: 400 pounds
  • Deflated size: Not specified

Durability: 

Performance: 

Value: 

Features: Convertible backpack/seat, multiple footrest positions, cargo net storage area, front and rear skegs, carry handles, includes paddle

Ideal for: Paddlers on a budget. Lakes and slow rivers. Hiking into a paddling location. Paddlers that want something easy to get on and off of.

  from $39.99

Buy on Amazon

(price updated as of 2019-05-25 at 22:56 – Details)

The Sevylor Quikpak is very lightweight and compact, even for an inflatable kayak. It comes with a clever carrying pack that converts into the kayak’s seat, which is a nice feature to have if you plan on hiking into a paddling location or have a longer walk from your car to the launch point.

Despite its compact size, the Quikpak has a 400 pound maximum capacity, making it a good option if you have a lot of gear or if you’re a heavier paddler.

It’s a sit on top kayak which makes it a bit easier to get on an off of. With a hull of 36 inches wide and both front and rear skegs, it’s got good stability and tracks well through the water.

Another feature unique to the Quikpak are its multi-position footrests, which help improve comfort and control while paddling.

 

Intex Challenger K2 (tandem)

Intex Challenger K2 (tandem)

Intex Challenger K2 Kayak, 2-Person Inflatable Kayak Set with Aluminum Oars and High Output Air Pump

Overview:

  • Length: 11’ 6”
  • Width: 30”
  • Weight: 33.57 pounds
  • Weight Capacity: 400 pounds
  • Deflated size: 16.25 in x 23.125 in x 12.5 in

Durability: 

Performance: 

Value: 

Features: Inflatable seats, cargo net storage, removable skeg, includes paddle

Ideal for: Paddlers on a budget. Lakes and slow rivers. A mix of both single and tandem paddling.

  from $91.98

Buy on Amazon

(price updated as of 2019-05-25 at 22:56 – Details)

The Challenger K2 is the tandem version of the popular K1 Challenger. Like the K1, it’s fairly narrow, which helps it cut through the water more quickly. It also has the cargo net storage space and a removable skeg.

As detailed in the full Intex Challenger K2 review, the K2’s narrower hull makes it a bit less stable in favor of greater efficiency so, may not be as good of an option for paddlers that want a very stable kayak.

Like the Explorer K2, the Challenger K2’s seats offer only limited adjustment, so it’s not quite a convertible kayak. If you want to do a mix of solo and tandem paddling, there are better options out there.

If you’re trying to decide between the Challenger K2 and the Explorer K2, check out the Intex Explorer vs Challenger comparison.

 

Sea Eagle SE370 (convertible)

Sea Eagle SE370 (convertible)

Sea Eagle SE370 Inflatable Sport Kayak Pro Package

Overview:

  • Length: 12’ 6”.
  • Width: 34”.
  • Weight: 32 pounds
  • Weight Capacity: 650 pounds
  • Deflated size: 31” x 19” x 8”

Durability: 

Performance: 

Value: 

Features: inflatable and adjustable seats, drain valve, two rear skegs, carry handles, includes paddles

Ideal for: Lakes and slow rivers. Up to class III rapids. Mixed solo and tandem paddling. Paddlers looking for a good compromise between value and quality.

  $324.99

Buy on Amazon

(price updated as of 2019-05-25 at 23:35 – Details)

 

As mentioned in the detailed Sea Eagle SE370 review, the SE370 offers a great compromise between value and quality. It’s a bit more expensive than the entry level inflatable kayaks but is significantly more durable and should give you quite a few years of reliable paddling.

It has a generous weight capacity of 650 pounds meaning it can handle up to 3 adult passengers though, it only comes with 2 seats. The higher weight capacity is also helpful if you have a lot of gear.

The SE370 is on the long side at 12’ 6” making it nice and roomy but it’s a little more susceptible to being pushed around if you get a good crosswind.

A testament to its durability, the SE370 is also rated for up to class III rapids and has a drain valve to help remove any water that splashes inside the boat.

If you like the SE370 but think it might be a bit too roomy, check out the Sea Eagle SE330 review or read the Sea Eagle 330 vs 370 comparison. The SE330 is a bit more compact and easier to handle as a solo paddler.

 

Advanced Elements AdvancedFrame AE1012-R (single)

Advanced Elements AdvancedFrame AE1012-R (single)

Advanced Elements AE1012-R AdvancedFrame Inflatable Kayak

Overview:

  • Length: 10’ 5”.
  • Width: 32”.
  • Weight: 36 pounds
  • Weight Capacity: 300 pounds
  • Deflated size: 30” x 17” x 10”

Durability: 

Performance: 

Value: 

Features: Rigid frame, padded seat, carry handles, skeg, inflatable coaming for use with spray skirt, bungee deck storage, carrying duffle bag.

Ideal for: Coastal water. Lakes and slow rivers. Extended day trips. Paddlers that want performance similar to a hard-shell but the portability of an inflatable.

  $471.95

Buy on Amazon

(price updated as of 2019-05-25 at 22:56 – Details)

The defining feature of Advanced Elements’ AdvancedFrame kayak is its built-in aluminum ribs that help create a defined bow and stern. The frame helps it cut through the water for improved tracking and speed and rivals the performance of a hard-shell kayak. You can read more about it in the Advanced Elements AdvancedFrame review.

The AdvancedFrame does well in lakes and rivers but is also designed to handle the rougher conditions of open coastal waters. Its frame and relatively narrow hull help it to cut through waves, while its inflatable coaming and optional spray skirt can help keep water from splashing inside the cockpit.

The AdvancedFrame is on the narrower side at 32”, but the lower seating position helps to maintain stability. It’s constructed out of 3 layers of durable material for excellent puncture resistance.

One downside is that it doesn’t come with a paddle or pump, so you’ll have to pick those up separately.

 

Advanced Elements AdvancedFrame AE1007-R (convertible)

Advanced Elements AdvancedFrame AE1007-R (convertible)

ADVANCED ELEMENTS AE-1007-R AdvancedFrame Convertible Inflatable Kayak, 15', Red

Overview:

  • Length: 15’
  • Width: 32”
  • Weight: 52 pounds
  • Weight Capacity: 550 pounds
  • Deflated size: 35” x 21” x 12”

Durability: 

Performance: 

Value: 

Features: Rigid frame, padded seats, carry handles, skeg, bungee deck storage, carrying duffle bag.

Ideal for: Coastal waters. Lakes and slow rivers. Extended day trips. Paddlers that want performance similar to a hard-shell but the portability of an inflatable. Mixed solo and tandem paddling.

  $649.95

Buy on Amazon

(price updated as of 2019-05-25 at 23:36 – Details)

The Advanced Elements AdvancedFrame AE1007-R is the convertible version of its single seat kayak. It has the same features including the aluminum ribs, durable 3-layer construction, and sleek hull that helps it excel not only on lakes and rivers, but coastal waters as well.

The thing that makes the AE1007-R really unique is the ability to swap out the deck of the kayak. You can go from the standard open deck – which makes it very easy to get in and out of and is great for paddling in flat water – to a closed deck that offers protection from splashing waves and allows the use of a spray skirt. The closed decks come in both a single and double configuration, so you can tackle rougher water by yourself or with a buddy.

This versatility provides a lot of value for paddlers that will be out in a variety of conditions and switching between solo and tandem paddling.

The downside is that you’ll have to purchase the closed decks separately as they aren’t included. Like the single version, you’ll also have to pick up a pump and paddles separately.

 

Sevylor Coleman Colorado (tandem)

Sevylor Coleman Colorado (tandem)

Sevylor Coleman Colorado 2-Person Fishing Kayak

Overview:

  • Length: 10’ 9”
  • Width: 39”
  • Weight: 41 pounds
  • Weight Capacity: 470 pounds
  • Deflated size: not specified

Durability: 

Performance: 

Value: 

Features: padded seats, carry handles, skeg, mesh storage bags, rod holders, trolling motor mount.

Ideal for: Lakes and slow rivers. Fishing with a buddy on a budget.

  $346.44

Buy on Amazon

(price updated as of 2019-05-25 at 23:36 – Details)

The Coleman Colorado is a solid entry level fishing kayak that’ll get you out fishing with a buddy without breaking the bank. It’s made out of thick gauge PVC with a reinforced tarpaulin hull. A nylon cover around the inflatable tubes gives it extra durability.

Dual paddle holders allow you to clip your paddles to the side of the boat to keep them out of the way while fishing. Like any decent fishing kayak, it also comes with several rod holders so you can adjust where you position your rod and has a good amount of storage for fishing gear and other essentials.

The Coleman Colorado, like most fishing kayaks, has a particularly wide hull for better stability when bringing in fish. The downside is that it’s slow going through the water. If you decide you want to upgrade your rig for a bit more speed, it has a motor mount that accepts smaller trolling motors.

It’s worth noting that this is primarily a fishing kayak – the rod holders aren’t removable and slightly obstruct paddling, making this less than ideal for paddlers that only occasionally want to fish. The seats also aren’t convertible so it doesn’t do as well if you want to occasionally fish solo.

 

Advanced Elements Straightedge (single)

Advanced Elements Straightedge (single)

Advanced Elements Straitedge Angler

Overview:

  • Length: 9’ 8”
  • Width: 35”
  • Weight: 41 pounds
  • Weight Capacity: 300 pounds
  • Deflated size: 30″ x 17″ x 10″

Durability: 

Performance: 

Value: 

Features: aluminum ribs, removable mounting rail, rod holders, high-backed seat with lumbar support, carry handles.

Ideal for: Lakes and slow rivers. Coastal waters. Up to class III rapids. Extended fishing trips. Committed anglers that want performance and the advantage of an inflatable.

  $544.95

Buy on Amazon

(price updated as of 2019-05-25 at 23:35 – Details)

For anglers that want a fishing kayak that performs like a hard-shell with the storage and portability advantages of an inflatable, Advanced Elements’ Straightedge could be a good option.

Like their other kayaks, the Straightedge has Advanced Elements’ patented aluminum rib for improved tracking and speed. It has a removable mounting rail so you can customize your rig with additional rod holders, fish finders, and other accessories.

The padded seat with inflatable lumbar support is a nice touch for increased comfort on extended fishing trips.

It’s constructed out of 3 layers of durable material and has abrasion resistant patches where you need them most.

If the 300 pound weight limit isn’t enough for you and your gear, the upgraded Straightedge Pro model holds up to 400 pounds, has even greater stability, and has some nice additional features.

 

NRS Outlaw I (single)

NRS Outlaw I (single)

NRS Outlaw I Inflatable Kayak Green, 9'10

Overview:

  • Length: 9’ 10”
  • Width: 38”
  • Weight: 26 pounds
  • Weight Capacity: not specified
  • Deflated size: not specified

Durability: 

Performance: 

Value: 

Features: rigid 8-10 psi floor, drop stitch floor, 18″ bow and stern kicker, self bailing

Ideal for: Rapids.

  $660.25

Buy on Amazon

(price updated as of 2019-05-25 at 23:36 – Details)

NRS is one of the most trusted names in whitewater kayaking and their Outlaw I makes for a solid entry level whitewater inflatable.

It has a durable drop stitch floor that inflates to a rigid  8-10 psi and an 18 inch kick along its bow and stern to help it punch through waves.

The Outlaw II is self bailing so you won’t get swamped when waves splash into the boat.

If you want to hit the rapids with a buddy, NRS also makes a tandem version of the Outlaw with similar specs.

 

Best Inflatable Kayak for the Ocean

Advanced Elements AE1012-R AdvancedFrame Inflatable Kayak

It’s hard to beat the Advanced Elements AdvancedFrame AE1012-R for paddling in coastal waters. Its rigid frame and low profile help it track through the water even in the presence of waves and wind. Its design and the ability to use a spray skirt to keep water out, makes it much better suited to ocean paddling compared to other inflatables.

It also uses Advanced Elements’ durable 3-layer construction to help it hold up to being launched and beached along rocky shorelines. If you plan to do a mix of solo and tandem paddling, the AdvancedFrame AE1007-R is essentially the same model but is convertible – allowing you to paddle alone or with a buddy.

 

Best Inflatable Tandem Kayak

Sea Eagle SE370 Inflatable Sport Kayak Pro Package

Its durable hull, generous 650 pound weight capacity, and convertible seats make the Sea Eagle SE370 a good all-around option for most people.

It’s at home on lakes and rivers, as well as up to class III rapids, which means you’ll be able to use it in a variety of conditions. At 12′ 6″, it’s got enough space to squeeze in a third person and can also be converted for solo paddling if necessary.

Its only real limitations are that it’s a bit slower than the other tandems and not ideal for exposed coastal waters. If performance or coastal paddling are important to you, consider upgrading to the Advanced Elements AdvancedFrame AE1007-R.

 

Best Inflatable Fishing Kayak

Advanced Elements Straitedge Angler

Besides the standard feature of adjustable rod holders, the Advanced Elements Straightedge packs in a number of premium features that committed anglers will appreciate.

Its adjustable seat with additional lumbar support will help extend your time out on the water and you’ll be able to customize your rig however you see fit with its removable mounting rail. It’s also built to last with its 3-layer construction and strategically places abrasion-resistant patches.

If the 300 pound weight capacity isn’t enough or you want some additional stability – as well as some other nice features – consider upgrading to the Straightedge Pro.

If you’re on a budget or want to hit the water with a buddy, the Sevylor Coleman Colorado is a good alternative.

 

Best Inflatable Kayak for Whitewater

NRS Outlaw I Inflatable Kayak Green, 9'10

The solo NRS Outlaw I and tandem Outlaw II are both durable and well-designed whitewater inflatables by one of the most trusted brands in whitewater kayaking.

Their drop-stitch floor and the 18 inch kicker along the bow and stern will help you punch through waves and hold up to impacts against rocks and branches.

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